Job For A Cowboy

Doom

Doom


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 01/01/2007

Time to realise the potential this one displays

Doom, originally released in November 2005 (Both independently and through small label King of the Monsters Records), was the self-financed debut E.P. offering from Glendale (Arizona) based deathcore act Job for a Cowboy that eventually secured the young act a deal with Metal Blade Records in June this year. With the quartet (Currently comprising of vocalist Jonny Davy, guitarists Ravi Bhadriraju and Bobby Thompson and bassist Brent Riggs) currently in the studio recording their debut full-length album, Metal Blade Records have decided to give listeners a taste of what’s to come from the group with a re-release of band’s original E.P. Doom.

Running for little more than a minute, Catharsis For The Buried is a suitably creepy introduction piece for the album with the sounds of someone screaming ‘Let me out!’ and soon makes way for the first official track Entombment of a Machine. Entombment of a Machine is a clear indication of what Doom has in store for the listener, with an overall sound primarily made up of death metal mixed with subtle metalcore influences. Davy’s vocals range from guttural growls to high-pitched pig squealing, while the guitarists provide moments of heavy groove, mingled in with some tight knit riff work. While both elements are performed with a level of competency, there’s nothing on show here that really lifts the track to something special or unique sounding.

Both The Rising Tide and Relinquished are again well-executed lessons in pure brutality (Especially with Elliott Sellers’ varied work behind the drum kit), but again, they both lack that something special in the song writing department to keep them interesting for their full duration of their five minute running lengths. Knee Deep on the other hand really does have something more to offer, with the majority of the song following a huge groove pattern (Expertly guided by the drums), making the song one of the more memorable efforts on the E.P. Although not quite up to the same standard, the strong sinister vibe found in Suspended By The Throat does stand out as something different from what the band generally offers up, while the uncredited hidden track Entities (Exclusive to the Metal Blade Records re-release) finishes things up in fine form with some memorable melodic lead work from the half way mark onwards.

Give the young age of the band members, and their relatively short existence together (Having been founded only four years ago), it’s easy to put aside the obvious short comings in the song writing and enjoy Doom for what it is – A destructive piece of work. But in saying that, I really do hope that the potential heard on Doom is fully realised with their upcoming full-length debut.

(King of the Monsters/Metal Blade Records/Stomp Records Distribution)

More from Job for a Cowboy

Doom

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 01/01/2007