Comeback Kid

Wake The Dead

Wake The Dead


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 22/02/2005

Definitely a stayer

One of the most talked about 'have to hear' acts on the hardcore scene in recent times has to be (Winnipeg) Canadian band Comeback Kid. Initially starting out a side project for Figure Four vocalist Andrew Neufeld (Who switched to guitars and backing vocals here) and vocalist Scott Wade in 2002, the five piece act (Who are rounded out with fellow Figure Five guitarist Jeremy Hiebert, bassist Kevin Call and drummer Kyle Profeta) created quite a rumbling within the scene with their six track demo of the same year, and their reputation as a formidable live act. 2003 saw Facedown Records release Comeback Kid's debut album Turn It Around, which further fuel the groups continual rising within the underground ranks.

Victory Records sensed big things from the band (Prompting their signing), and with the production, mixing and engineering team of Bill Stevenson (Descendents, ALL and Black Flag drummer) and Jason Livemore, Comeback Kid have returned with their second, and stronger effort, Wake The Dead.

False Idols Fall is a ripping start to the album with virtually no time wasted from the band as they deliver a powerful statement of intent in just under the three-minute mark. There's a slight change of formula for the Comeback Kid sound this time around, with Wade utilizing more of his aggressive tone, while the gang backing vocals seem to be more prominent too. My Other Side indeed shows another side to the bands song writing style with some great breakdowns (Which are kept to a minimum throughout compared to their last outing), while the title track Wake The Dead is a huge sounding anthem that shows the progression of the band, and is sure to became a live favourite with the enticing sing along passages.

The trial and tribulations of relationships is delivering in punishing simplicity (Yet equally as catchy) in The Trouble I Love (And to a lesser extent Partners In Crime), while Talk Is Cheap and Our Distance (Featuring backup vocals from Russ Rankin of Only Crime and Good Riddance) are downright venomous. Bright Lights Keep Shining, Falling Apart and Losing Patience all keep up the energetic pace of the previous tracks with running times that barely break past the two minute time frame, while the trading vocals (The gang and Wade) in the final blast of Final Goodbye literally pushes things into the red.

Hardcore albums seem to be coming and going as frequently as ever these days (Especially from Victory Records), and fewer stick around for any great length of time (Let alone remembered as anything special). But with Wake Up Dead, Comeback Kid not only beg repeated listens, but ensure that their name won't be forgotten for quite some time yet, and one to look out for in the future.

(Victory Records/Stomp Records Distribution)

More from Comeback Kid

Wake The Dead

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 22/02/2005