Forbidden

Forbidden Evil

Forbidden Evil


Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 22/02/2005

That which burns twice as bright burns twice as fast.

The opening riffage of Chalice Of Blood furiously peaks with Russ Anderson's high pitched scream that almost sends shivers down the spine to the same degree as Tom Araya's lung work on Slayers's Angel Of Death (from 1986's Reign In Blood). The riffs, the vocals, the time changes and the content - it could only be from the thrash era of the 1980's. Like many of their brethren at the time, they are also San Francisco Bay Area natives as well.

After the first wave of thrash bands hit in the early 80s (Metallica, Slayer, Anthrax, Megadeth and Exodus), the second wave consisted of bands like Vio-lence, Heathen, Nuclear Assault and Forbidden. This second round assault was even more aggressive than the first but its lifespan was reduced. Bands would have strong albums for the first couple of releases but the tide of the music biz changed with the arrival of grunge, and the metal world shifted accordingly and it quickly became a case of only the strong surviving.

Forbidden started life as Forbidden Evil when a young Robb Flynn (ex-Vio-lence, now Machine Head) was also a part of the line-up. Although Flynn had a hand in writing a couple of their early tunes, he left to join Vio-lence before Forbidden had recorded their debut. The moniker of Forbidden Evil was retained for the title of their debut album but the word Evil was dropped from the band's name prior to its release.

Post the first two albums, Forbidden's releases didn't really make much of a mark. Whilst they didn't pale in comparison, they weren't quite of the same calibre as their debut or its follow up. The debut Forbidden Evil is a 100% pure thrash-a-thon. Track after track of attack in the form of Through Eyes Of Glass, Marching Into Fire and the blistering title track - Forbidden Evil showcases the thrash-fuelled aggression of this group at their finest. Sure the maturity level of their writing was upped on its successor Twisted Into Form, but for an ear bashing of fast paced, high quality thrash, you simply cannot go past this killer debut. This is as essential as any of the big albums of the thrash genre.

(Combat (Originally)/Century Media (Re-release))

More from Forbidden

Forbidden Evil

Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 22/02/2005