D4, The

Out Of My Head

Out Of My Head


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 02/03/2005

Moving on up in the world

It's hard to tell if the hype surrounding New Zealand's The D4 is all of their own making, or simply a reaction from the press to their particular take on rock and roll playing live. For a number of years (Having formed back in 1998), The D4 have been making a name for themselves with a sound that blend's the edginess of Detroit legends MC5 with a slight twist of punk, and shows around the globe that have brought down the house, and reviewers to their knees. But as good as it's been, it's in the studio where The D4 have yet to really win over some hardened hacks. Sure, singles such as Rock 'N' Roll Motherfucker, Get Loose and the bands debut album 6Twenty (Released in 2001) had their moments, but a collection of moments doesn't always come across as classics in the long run.

So with a solid two years touring under their collective belts, and recording sessions held in both London and their native New Zealand, the four piece act (Who are guitarists/vocalists Jimmy and Dion, bassist Vaughan and drummer Beaver) are back with their second effort Out Of My Head, with the hype machine already proving to be in full swing. While this all sounds like a set up for a big putdown, I have to admit that The D4 have really come up with the goods on Out Of My Head, and the frantic energy of the albums leading single Sake Bomb (Released a few months ago, and the first promotional video clip from the album) is a fitting introduction to the bands love of all things intoxicating.

The title track Out Of My Head and Omerta (Based on the Mafia's code of silence) are rousing sing along anthems, while the up-tempo feel good groove of Feel It Like It (And Too Stupid) are undeniably irresistible in their simplicity and distinctly hard rocking sixties MC5 like vibe. Taking a far more serious turn is the wall of noise monster What I Want (Produced by the renown Alan Moulder, and the albums second single), Trust Nobody and Do No Right, while Peepshow, the ridiculously titled Rock 'N' Rule and the Japanese version of Sake Bomb help keeps the mood (And energy levels) up.

The album isn't would a couple of surprises. The covers of Lime Spiders' Out Of Control (1985) and The Fun Things' Savage (1980) may have been obscure choices, but work well within The D4's sound, while the raw, sedated and self produced blues feel of Stops Me Cold and the 'live in the studio' pounding of Diamond, Ruby, Stone help add different flavours to diversify the standard garage rock approach. The D4 may have had their one eyed supporters in the past, but with Out Of My Head, they've finally managed to match their high profile publicity image with a an equally hard hitting product to match. A true rock 'n' roll act can only be seen in the live format, but I'll be damned if The D4 haven't gotten as close to capturing the same thing in the studio here.

(Festival Mushroom Records)

Out Of My Head

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 02/03/2005