A Different Breed Of Killer

I, Colossus

I, Colossus


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 20/05/2008

Nothing new here

With a history that goes back as far as October 2006 (when the first incarnation of this band officially came into being), there's really not a lot to say about Knoxville (Tennessee) based metallic hardcore/deathcore act A Different Breed of Killer. Apart from going through a few line-up changes and touring with a string of underground acts, the biggest thing to happen to A Different Breed of Killer was the offer to sign up with post/metallic hardcore label Rise Records in late 2007. And really, that's as interesting as things get here, because on A Different Breed of Killer's debut full-length effort I, Colossus, there's not a real lot to get too excited about.

Predictably enough, the five piece act (who comprise of vocalist Jesse Mainor, guitarists Ethan Brown and Trevor McKee, bassist Louie Thal and drummer Nija Walker) open up the album with a suitably creepy piano/effect driven instrumental piece in Dawning. Although interesting, it does tend to drag a little at a minute and a half long. Liberation of a Giant gets the album underway in an official capacity, and I can't say that it's an all inspiring start to proceedings. Combining death metal blast beats, hardcore breakdowns and metalcore like riffing, A Different Kind of Killer deliver what is essentially all the characteristic traits of a tired and generic genre that's lacking much in the way of anything remotely inspired.

Some vaguely melodic groove elements are present in The Accidentist (which comes complete with the obligatory hardcore ganged styled shouting back-ups), the title track I, Colossus, To Dismantle the Architect (The Meeting) and the lengthy The Glorious Fall (which is without a doubt the strongest track on the album alongside the instrumental closer Aural Apocalypse), but a few moments don't necessarily add up to a memorable listen overall.

A Different Breed of Killer doesn't bring anything new to the metallic hardcore/deathcore scene whatsoever. In summary, I, Colossus is as cliché and forgettable as these sort of albums come.

(Rise Records/Stomp Distribution)

I, Colossus

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 20/05/2008