Pain

Cynic Paradise

Cynic Paradise


Reviewed By David Andrews
Published 19/12/2008

Headbanging N' Glowsticking

With his band Pain, Sweden's prolific Peter Tägtgren has been fusing industrial metal with techno since 1997. Originally conceived as a studio bound solo project, it afforded Tägtgren an outlet for music that didn't suit the death metal sound of his other band, Hypocrisy. Now with a touring lineup, Pain is a fully fledged band and earlier this year toured as the support act for Nightwish whose singer Anette Olzon guests on two tracks on their latest release, Cynic Paradise. Serving up an infectious cocktail of catchy melodies, industrial riffing and eurodance cheese, Cynic Paradise succeeds in being both pummeling and poptastic.

Starting off with some choral synth, I'm Going In quickly gets down to business with a driving chug and catchy chorus. Monkey Business ups the ante with some heavy staccato riffing complementing the melodies. Anette Olzon makes her first appearance on Follow Me which is an insidiously memorable pop song. The first video from the album, it's easy to understand how this track might have helped Cynic Paradise debut in both the Swedish and Finnish top 30.

Things get a bit different with the slide guitar ho down of Have A Drink On Me, a tongue in cheek ditty about those dang wimmin what done him wrong. Don't Care, Generation X and Live Fast/Die Young continue with the template of catchy melodies, industrial beats and guitars while Reach Out (And Regret) injects some White Zombie style swagger into the mix. No One Knows is the album's most unusual cut with tempos slowed right down and a mournful chorus. Proceedings are rounded out with Not Your Kind, a slower number that recalls latter day Depeche Mode, and Feed Us which is the second track to feature Anette Olzon.

Pain has ticked all the boxes with Cynic Paradise and it should appeal to fans of melodic industrial metal with a strong pop sensibility.

(Nuclear Blast Records/Riot! Entertainment)

More from Pain

Cynic Paradise

Reviewed By David Andrews
Published 19/12/2008