Demigod

Let Chaos Prevail

Let Chaos Prevail


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 04/09/2009

A solid effort but hardly cutting edge

Demigod’s debut full-length effort ‘Slumber of Sullen Eyes’ from 1992 (the follow-up to their split E.P. release with Necropsy in the same year) may not have been the biggest selling release or the most recognised at the time, but in the years since then, it’s been hailed as a death metal masterpiece, and one of the Scandinavian scene’s landmark releases.

With little recognition for their efforts at the time, the Finnish act disbanded in 1994 to focus on other musical projects, only to return in 1997 with a revamped line-up and a surprisingly new direction on their sophomore effort ‘Shadow Mechanics’ in 2002 (which was released through Spikefarm Records). While many found the progression between ‘Slumber of Sullen Eyes’ and ‘Shadow Mechanics’ a little too advanced and dramatic, the change at least proved that Demigod weren’t interested in sticking around to reproduce the same album, time and time again.

It took another five years and another line-up change for the five piece act (comprising of vocalist Tuomas Ala-Nissilä, guitarists Jussi Kiiski, and Tuomas Karppinen, bassist Sami Vesanto and drummer Tuomo Latvala) to finally emerge with their independently released third full-length effort ‘Let Chaos Prevail’. Two years on from its initial release (and a year after the band split up for good), the album has been given a long overdue local release.

Much like the shift in direction between the band’s two releases, ‘Let Chaos Prevail’ shows a further move into new territory for Demigod, with the bulk of the album relying on groove orientated direction, and Ala-Nissilä adopting an almost clean hardcore-like approach to his vocals.

The opening track ‘Not Dead Enough’ is fairly indicative of what the album has in store for its ten track duration, with Demigod putting forth a punishing yet catchy groove based death metal sound amid subtle flourishes of the band’s technical precision of their past work heard throughout the riff and solo work.

The title track ‘Let Chaos Prevail’, ‘Baptized in Enmity’ and ‘Cult of Sickness’ are just some of the faster efforts on the album that stand strong within the track listing, while the progressive/experimental ‘God Said Suffer’, ‘To See the Last One Die’ and ‘The Uncrowned’ are the pick of the remainder of the album.

‘Let Chaos Prevail’ certainly isn’t the classic that ‘Slumber of Sullen Eyes’ was all those years ago, but then Demigod isn’t the same band they were back in 1992 either. Both time and the members have moved on since then, and so has their music.

Overall, while ‘Let Chaos Prevail’ is hardly a cutting edge release within the death metal realm, it’s a solid album from Demigod, and features enough surprises to keep those interested in the band’s output pleased for the most part.

(Xtreem Music/Conspire Destroy/Aztec Music Distribution)

Let Chaos Prevail

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 04/09/2009

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