Day Late, The

The Day Late

The Day Late


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 12/09/2009

A good debut hints at good things for the future

Over the last few years, there’s been tremendous growth within the Australian progressive/alternative rock scene, with several names starting to make a name for themselves out of the ever-growing movement. One name that’s starting to get banded around is Gippsland (Victoria) based outfit The Day Late, who recently released their self-titled E.P.

While the band have been around in one form or another for close to five years, it was only ten months ago that they consolidated their current line-up (comprising of vocalist/guitarist Rohan Hayes, guitarist Dean Horton, bassist/backing vocalist Dave De Vent, keyboardist/backing vocalist Joel Celima and drummer/backing vocalist Shaun ‘PIG’ Aitken), prompting the band to finally venture into their own studio, and emerge with their debut effort.

Running for just over a minute, the sound effects/keyboard driven piece The Prodrome (a medical term used to describe early symptoms indicating the onset of an attack or a disease) serves as an introductory piece in the lead up to the first official track Sirens. With a slow build up, Sirens boasts a strong and atmospheric keyboard presence underlining the verses, before eventually allowing the heavy guitar riffing through the choruses. Despite initially sounding promising (building keyboards and the emergence of heavy guitars), Sirens doesn’t quite manage to get off the ground due to a weak chorus, and Hayes lack of strength in the vocal department.

The follow up track Gluttony (Repent) again starts out with a promising proposition with its huge chunky riffing and its slow build up towards the chorus, and it’s here that the band finally manage to deliver. Although some of the heavier moments don’t quite gel, and the chorus structures could do with a little more work, Sirens is overall a strong track.

It isn’t until Solemn Chant that The Day Late really proves just what they’re truly capable off, with the song featuring just the right amount of heaviness, progressiveness and melodic appeal (courtesy of Hayes’ great performance) to make it absolutely stand out. From here, The Day Late just seem to improve with every song hereafter, with the dramatic Drop, Wither & Fade (by far the most guitar driven track on the E.P.) and the gentle piano based closer Ghost all maintaining the same high standard of consistency of strong and memorable song writing.

Putting aside the somewhat weak production value (the E.P. was self produced, mixed and engineered), and the shaky couple of efforts, overall The Day Late have released a good first effort, and one that at the very least, hints at some real potential for the band’s future endeavours.

(Independent)

The Day Late

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 12/09/2009

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