Claim the Throne

Ale Tales

Ale Tales


Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 08/01/2010

Australian Viking's opt for a change of pace

Melodic death metal focussing on medieval and Viking themes isn’t something you would commonly associate with an Australian band, but then Perth (Western Australian) act Claim the Throne isn’t what you would call a conventional band by any means.

Hot on the heels of their debut full-length effort Only the Brave Return (which was independently released in 2008 that was packaged with a fantasy based book written by the band to accompany the soundtrack), Claim the Throne have returned with their new E.P. Ale Tales.

Once again, the five piece act (who comprise of vocalist/guitarist Brendon ‘Baronaxe’ Capriotti, guitarist Oliver ‘Havanti’ Soos, bassist/vocalist Jim ‘Lord Jim’ Parker, keyboardist/vocalist Jesse ‘Jesselina’ Millea and drummer Brenton ‘Brentonious’ Pedler) have put together something extra, with the E.P. being packed with a bonus D.V.D.

On the musical side of things, Ale Tales sees the band toning down their melodic death metal sound to make way for a greater folk metal influence, with the opening instrumental Plundersaga and Of Mead & Weed not only coming across as the strongest efforts on the E.P., but also the only tracks that come close to the sound heard on the band’s debut.

Set Sail on Ale is a solid enough track, with the trading off between glowed efforts and the clean vocals giving the song a little more bite, while the faster paced Fable From An Oaken Table initially starts off in an aggressive manner, but makes way for a greater acoustic folk sound for the most part, before finishing up with the chanting acoustic based Two Pints of Honey & a Barrel Full of Beer.

On the visual side of things, the D.V.D. comprises of the promotional video clip for Set Sail on Ale (both the original and band’s edited versions), some behind the scenes footage of the making of Set Sail on Ale (running for close to seven minutes) and live footage of their release party for Only the Brave Return (running for around nineteen minutes).

Claim the Throne has a great reputation as a live band, with their shows regularly receiving raving reviews. But in the studio, the band still has some way to go. There are some great ideas throughout Ale Tales, but sadly not enough to keep the E.P. consistent or worthy of repeat listens.

If the band keeps progressing at their current rate, then it’s only a matter of time before they emerge with something comparable to their live shows. But until then, Claim the Throne is something you have to see rather than hear to truly appreciate.

(Prime Cuts Music/Riot! Entertainment)

More from Claim the Throne

Ale Tales

Reviewed By Justin Donnelly
Published 08/01/2010

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