Kamelot

Poetry for the Poisoned

Poetry for the Poisoned


Reviewed By Rod Whitfield
Published 25/01/2011

Poison for the ears

There’s really nothing to see here, move along people. Kamelot are an American power metal band who, of course, have been around for many a year and have released many an album. So they must be doing something right, according to some. But on their newie, Poetry for the Poisoned, they’re sounding kinda tame and wishy washy. Think a watered down version of maybe someone like Symphony X or Angra, but without the progressive elements.

There’s much to be said for such terms as ‘each to his/her own’, ‘it’s all subjective’ and ‘one person’s food is another one’s poison’ and all that. But to these ears, some of these power metal bands need to put a rocket up their arse and Kamelot are a prime example. The vast majority of their tunes trudge along at about half rat pace and simply never rise to any great heights at all. To put it quite bluntly, this album is quite boring and had me nodding off about a third of the way in. The musicianship and production is just adequate, and the vocalist sometimes sounds like David Bowie on a bad day.

Some blinding fretwork and female vocals arrive a little before half way in to shake things up to a certain extent, and there are a few moments here and there that have you pricking your ears up and taking notice (Necropolis has a nice fat grooving riff, for example, plus some nice subtle orchestration and more of that blistering lead work. Undoubtedly the album’s best cut). But all this ultimately fail to lift this above a plodding snorefest overall.

Sometimes the genre title ‘power metal’ is just a misnomer. Some of it simply isn’t very powerful at all. If you’re a power metal fan and you’re reading this, don’t get mad, get some Aussie stuff! Get your arse down to JB Hi Fi or your online download store and grab the latest from Black Majesty, Lord or Eyefear. It’ll have a lot more oomph than this.

(Riot! Entertainment)

More from Kamelot

Poetry for the Poisoned

Reviewed By Rod Whitfield
Published 25/01/2011