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Blatherskite

Three Worlds

6/10

Three Worlds


Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 03/10/2005

Tool influenced experimental rock with promise

Sydney (AUS) quartet Blatherskite formed in 1996 and after several line-ups and releases more in the punk/metal vein, they finally found their step moving more into the experimental rock vein. Vocalist Nick Goryl, guitarist Tim Lim, bassist Justin Min and drummer Brendan Davie began working on Three Worlds back in 2002 and it's finally seen the light of day some three years on.

There's nothing to say about the pointless 39 second intro piece titled .... as this effort really begins with the noise infested Warning which is a dark, brooding piece that slowly builds in to a wall of thick, distorted guitars and the occasional Maynard Keenan (Tool, A Perfect Circle) like vocal performances. Some very melodic guitar runs backed with some well placed rhythms early on define the feel of Adaptor as something that you could even expect to find on Tool's classic Undertow album, particularly with it's epic nature clocking in a just on nine minutes.

You could easily split this album in half with the interlude (also titled ....) which is equally as pointless as the introduction piece. It doesn't add any breathing space to the album. In fact, if anything, it disrupts the vibe that was achieved with the Warning and Adaptor. That aside, the momentum is picked up again with Drawback in which Goryl sounds more like Keenan than ever before and the Tool elements are very obvious - from the spacey guitars to the bass tones and lines. It's by no means a bad thing. It's just that it's more present on this track that the rest. The just short of twenty minute closer, Love Song, moves through a variety of time changes and emotions to round it all out. It could definitely do with some editing as in reality there's only a little over fourteen minutes of substance to it.

Blatherskite is definitely offering something different into the Australia hard rock etc music scene with their Tool influenced alt rock but it won't be for everyone. For a first effort however, Three Worlds (which was entirely self recorded and produced) shows promise and with a little more experience and some refinement of their craft, it'll be interesting to see what Blatherskite come up with next.

(Independent)

More from Blatherskite

Three Worlds

Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 03/10/2005