Teramobil

Magnitude of Thoughts

Magnitude of Thoughts

NewCore Music
Reviewed By Andrew McKaysmith
Published 10/01/2017

Many years ago I was listening to Cannibal Corpse's then new release Gore Obsessed. I was listening on my PC and without realising I managed to get the album to start playing via a 2nd multimedia application. So there I am listening to the same album simultaneously. I recall thinking "Whoa, Cannibal Corpse have seriously outdone themselves in the extremity stake's on this one!" The only reason I noticed something was amiss is that the "song" had gone on for a lot longer than anticipated. On that note- Listening to Teramobil's Magnitude of Thoughts reminds me a lot of that episode.

If you can imagine J.K Simmons' ferocious character in the Oscar winning film Whiplash drilling Periphery into a djent-inspired, math/death fit of rage, that more or less sums up what's happening on Magnitude of Thoughts.

The ability of the musicians on this record is astounding, to put it simply. Even if assisted by technology, how on earth does drummer Alexandre Dupras keep time with the six string bass gymnastics of Dominc Lapointe? Not to mention the needle and thread guitar histrionics of Mathieu Berube? There's no wonder this is an album with no vocals as there is actually nowhere amongst the din for them to be effective or even useful.

Unfortunately I found the album rather hard to listen to for more than a few spins as the lads offer very little in the way of a reprieve from the sonic onslaught. To underline this point the highlight on the album is the section with the Hammond organ sounding keys toward the end of second track "Magnitude of Thoughts". I liked this a lot as it showcased a very different side of the band that sacrificed none of the tech death savagery found elsewhere. In this passage the band use a more traditional heavy metal riff to support a sparkle of keys that shimmer, then climb like the tendrils of the plant-alien on the artwork accompanying the album. I hope they build on this, as it is a truly unique sounding option they could mine to magnificent effect on a future release.

Elsewhere, "Exoteric" offers a stunning bass interlude. It's effectively a guitar solo using the bass as the medium, however both are using six strings so it works well. I recall as a young lad comparing albums with fellow musicians as to who had the tastiest, most note-worthy bass solo on a release, and well done, Dominc Lapointe, who wins this year!

Animals as Leaders released what I feel is the album of 2016 in The Madness of Many, and I'd suggest that if you liked that album at least check out Magnitude of Thoughts. Many of the attributes that allow The Madness of Many to succeed are missing on Magnitude of Thoughts, the most significant are the soulful Jazz modes overlaid a bed of djent courtesy of the virtuosic Tosin Abasi and Javier Reyes. That said, there are still some key similarities that could mean there is a large degree of cross over between the two fan bases. Think of Magnitude of Thoughts as the more dangerous, switchblade carrying cousin to the suit wearing and entrepreneurial The Madness of Many. 

I can't imagine just how many hours of practice it would take to become as proficient on an instrument as the skills on display here, and I'm someone who plays a few instruments! How will I remember this album? A podium place winner in metal's version of an arms race for blistering speed and sheer technicality.

Magnitude of Thoughts

NewCore Music

Reviewed By Andrew McKaysmith
Published 10/01/2017