Crematorium

The Process Of Endtime

The Process Of Endtime


Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 26/10/2005

Brutal riffs and blasts not at the expense of quality songs

Crematorium has been around since 1991 in one form or another. Over the years, this LA based self described “murdercore” styled metal group has undergone several line-up changes but it was their 2002 debut effort for Prosthetic Records titled For All Our Sins that put the band squarely on the extreme metal map. Since then, they've shared the stage with what reads as a “who's who” of extreme metal such as Cannibal Corpse, Cradle Of Filth, Suffocation, Nile and Impaled Nazarene. After three years, Crematorium (who are vocalist Daniel Dismal, guitarists Mark Uehlein and Frank Perez, bassist Aaron Ramson and drummer Taylor Young) have returned with yet another brutal slab of murdercore.

The short building intro of Bloodwake becomes a fury of death metal blasts that swaps between riff laden grooves as Dismal's throaty vocals switch between Glen Benton like death growls and more modern metalcore vocal elements which continues with the frantic attack of Reconstructed which features a tasteful and semi-traditional death metal styled solo. Drowning As One and Perils Of The Disillusioned stands out with their modern melodic thrash death approach showcasing plenty of tempo changes although the later track features some out of place sounding tremolo picking at times making it the slightly weaker of the two. Infinitesimal Acculturation is another of the albums stronger tracks with a flurry of double kick work and a crushing mid section that refuses to be nailed down to a single pace.

The slower paced Dying Under A Binary Star, whist containing some tidy guitar work and a reasonable amount of melody, is still a bit of a “nothing” track overall compared to the likes of Turn A Blind Eye which is led by a pummelling double kick intro and for the first time a true guttural (aka more death metal like) vocal approach is seen alternating with the aforementioned metalcore like elements. More early 90s death like riffs and vocals dominate Born Of The Deadtide before the blast beat attack of Testicular leaves you gasping for breath with it's relentless aggression throughout. There's nothing to say about the waste of space outtro End Of Days except that it's time reach for the stop button early.

It's been three years since the last release from Crematorium and whilst many would complain at such a delay, it's fair to say that if the standard of work that is churned out by these LA grindsters is of the quality of The Process Of Endtime, then there's little doubt that it's well worth the wait.

(Prosthetic Records/Stomp Distribution)

The Process Of Endtime

Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 26/10/2005