Stone Sour

Come What(Ever) May

Come What(Ever) May


Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 18/07/2006

Sophomore effort sees Stone Sour step up in a big way

With Slipknot once again taking some much needed downtime, it's time for the individual members to indulge themselves in whatever other bands they either have or have the opportunity to work with. The best news to come from this is the new Stone Sour album, Come What(ever) May which sees Slipknot vocalist Corey Taylor and guitarist Jim Root saddle up once again with guitarist Josh Rand and bassist Shawn Economaki. The only line-up change is the departure of drummer Joel Ekman who left the band and has been replaced by Roy Mayorga (ex-Soulfly, ex-Sepultura).

Kicking things off with a similar vibe as the opening track of their debut album (titled Get Inside), 30-30/150 delivers a quality assault of stomping rhythms and double kick work as Taylor balances on the edge of exploding as he switches between his solid clean vocals and his trademark aggressive bark. It's one of many memorable tracks on here, and one of a small handful that revisit that charged sound that Stone Sour offer up from time to time such as the later track Reborn. The politically charged lyrics of the title track, Come What(Ever) May, help make it one of the album's highlights whilst the catchy Hell & Consequences and Made Of Scars are just plain simple, effective and down right rockin'.

Taking on an unexpected approach early on is the very Pink Floyd-esque Sillyworld which switches in and out of the heavy rock and those mellow Pink Floyd isms throughout. It's the first real sign of the likes of the hit single Bother from their previous album and it's not long before the second half of the album produces some gems that are more than worthy equivalents. The soft-turns-rock build up of Your God, the delicate Through Glass and the very personal lyrics of the gentle yet moving ballad ZZYXZ Rd are all standout tracks that carry the flame set by the aforementioned hit single. Socio is the last of the solid, memorable tracks with 1st Person and Cardiff, whilst decent enough, not quite carrying the same strength as the rest of the material.

There's little doubt that the latest album from Stone Sour eclipses their at times hit and miss debut effort. The formula has been refined ten fold and the results speak for themselves. Come What(Ever) May shows Stone Sour step up significantly and prove without a shadow of doubt their viability as a heavy rock act, and for those looking for a starting point for Stone Sour, this is definitely the album for you.

(Roadrunner Records/Universal Music Australia Distribution)

More from Stone Sour

Come What(Ever) May

Reviewed By Simon Milburn
Published 18/07/2006